officialssay:

The Canadian Joint Delegation to NATO tweeted some advice for Russian soldiers entering Ukraine. Moscow claims that the soldiers are mistakenly crossing over, according to NPR. 

officialssay:

The Canadian Joint Delegation to NATO tweeted some advice for Russian soldiers entering Ukraine. Moscow claims that the soldiers are mistakenly crossing over, according to NPR

I like the first story the best, I think.

statedept:

The U.S. is missing opportunities because too many U.S. ambassadors have not arrived to fill vacant posts. A Senate backlog in confirming ambassadorial candidates has left the U.S. without permanent ambassadors in 40 countries and a total of 58 State Department nominees still awaiting confirmation.
This logjam in the Senate is hampering America’s role in the world. Read more here.

statedept:

The U.S. is missing opportunities because too many U.S. ambassadors have not arrived to fill vacant posts. A Senate backlog in confirming ambassadorial candidates has left the U.S. without permanent ambassadors in 40 countries and a total of 58 State Department nominees still awaiting confirmation.

This logjam in the Senate is hampering America’s role in the world. Read more here.

chriscarlonecreation:

Crimson Kitty
©Chris Carlone

Chris Carlone is a talented photographer and artist.

chriscarlonecreation:

Crimson Kitty

©Chris Carlone

Chris Carlone is a talented photographer and artist.

L.A. Times - Governor Brown, don’t veto pre-k.

wordpeggio:

From my article in the L.A. Times, June 19, 2014:

Providing access to early childhood education is not just something that California can afford to do; it is something that California can’t afford not to do. 

Unfortunately, even with the clear socioeconomic benefits and strong public support, there is still one major political obstacle to making wide access to early childhood education a reality: In the immortal words of David Simon, “Kids don’t vote.

Read more…

usnatarchives:

These color photographs show the troops getting ready for the D-Day assault at an British port. Most of the color stills in the National Archives show the preparations rather than the invasion.

You can see more color photographs on the Media Matters blog.

Image:  111-C-1258, “These American troops have loaded their equipment onto an LCT and are waiting the signal for the assault against the Continent.”

Image: 111-SC-1237, “American troops at a British port descend into barges which will take them to troop ships from which they will launch the attack against Hitler’s Fortress Europe.”

Image: 111-SC-1248, “Medics and litter bearers going up the ramp of an LCT which will take them to France for the assault against Hitler’s Europe.”

Image: 111-SC-1232, “American troops at a British port descend into barges which will take them to troop ships from which they will launch the attack against Hitler’s Fortress Europe.  Note Barrage balloons in the background.”

laughingsquid:

Host John Oliver Explains Net Neutrality on ‘Last Week Tonight’

John Oliver gets the word out about Net Neutrality.
(Nsfw in terms of language)

instagram:

Remembering US Veterans on Memorial Day

For more photos and videos from ceremonies throughout the US, browse the #memorialday hashtag and explore the location pages below.

People gathered in National Cemeteries across the US on Monday to honor the memory of those who lost their lives while serving in the Armed Forces.

Originally known as “Decoration Day” after the end of the American Civil War, Memorial Day since expanded to commemorate the fallen in all US military conflicts. Traditions include laying flowers and flags on soldiers’ graves, parades in towns throughout the country and public addresses by veterans and state legislators.

To see more photos and videos from ceremonies at National Cemeteries throughout the US, explore the following location pages:

Signal. Boost. Please.

"There’s not one Internet for deep-pocketed corporations and a separate Internet for everyone else — there’s the Internet, and it belongs to all of us. That’s the way it’s always been. And that’s the way it should continue to be.
 
But the FCC could change all of that by giving big Internet providers — corporations like Comcast, Time Warner Cable, AT&T, and Verizon — the power to pick and choose which traffic reaches consumers quickly—and which doesn’t.
 
Net neutrality has made the Internet a platform for innovation and economic growth. For example, YouTube started as a relatively small outfit above a pizzeria in a strip mall. YouTube wanted to compete with Google, which had an online video product called Google Video (later Google Videos). Net neutrality guaranteed that YouTube’s and Google’s videos would travel to consumers at the same speeds. Google wasn’t able to pay for a fast lane or any other unfair advantage. Even though Google was a bigger, wealthier, more established company, it had to compete with YouTube on a level playing field. And YouTube ultimately won because it offered a better product.
 
That’s what net neutrality is all about. There’s not one Internet for deep-pocketed corporations and a separate Internet for everyone else — there’s the Internet, and it belongs to all of us. That’s the way it’s always been. And that’s the way it should continue to be.
There aren’t many places left where every American can participate on an equal footing with deep-pocketed corporate interests. Our campaign finance laws are in shambles, giving uber-wealthy, often-anonymous groups free rein to amplify their voices over those of the general population. Our tax code is littered with special benefits for special interests. The rules of our civil justice system have been rewritten to insulate corporations from wrongdoing against workers and consumers. But the Internet remains an arena where the quality of one’s products, the value of one’s services, and the persuasiveness of one’s ideas matter more than the depth of one’s pockets. The FCC needs to keep it that way."

Senator Al Franken: Chairman Wheeler’s proposal would put start-ups and small businesses at a huge disadvantage. And the new costs created by this scheme will be passed along to consumers, who already are being squeezed by their cable and Internet bills. Big corporations will win; everyone else will lose. Americans never have tolerated this sort of thing, and we shouldn’t start now, especially as the biggest Internet providers are trying to get even bigger through mega-mergers. (via wilwheaton)

(via wilwheaton)